The best definition of essentialism I’ve seen is “less but better”. It’s a paradigm flip in a world increasingly concerned with doing more and optimizing productivity. Essentialism takes the reductivist approach. It’s not about how to get more things done; it’s about how to get the right things done.

As author Greg Mckeown says, the way of the Essentialist is living by design and not by default.

“If you take one thing away from this book, I hope you will remember this: whatever decision or challenge or crossroads you face in your life, simply ask yourself, ‘What is essential?’ Eliminate everything else.”

Essentialism is the art of divorcing external noise from internal voice. The world is full of information but not all of it is useful. There are a million tasks you could cram into your day but not all of them are crucial.

Essentialism exposes my frequent stumbling blocks—taking on too much, underestimating completion times, and letting the cumulative chaos eat into more precious areas of my life.

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